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Knoxville man accepts plea deal in sixth DUI offense

| May 2, 2014 | Drunk Driving Accidents

A local Knoxville man, already convicted in five previous DUI cases, has accepted a plea deal that would mean 20 years behind bars. The family of his latest victim is speaking out, though, after discovering that, after only six years, he will be eligible for parole.

This most recent DUI took the life of one man and injured five others, including the victim’s son, who was left with such serious brain injuries that he can no longer walk, talk, or engage in his favorite pastime—playing soccer.

The man’s wife and family are left to pick up the pieces and are outraged—and insulted—that the offender could see freedom in such a short time.

The collision took place August 23, 2013 on Governor John Sevier Highway. The intoxicated driver, whose toxicology report came back as positive for crack cocaine and Valium, veered into the oncoming lane, striking the victim’s vehicle and causing it to careen into an SUV.

Tennessee state law dictates that a fifth DUI automatically carries a felony charge, as does each conviction thereafter. He is facing two counts of vehicular assault and charges of aggravated vehicular homicide.

In the coming days, a judge will be tasked with deciding whether the plea deal is fair or not and either accept or reject it. The family is pleading for the latter.

Cases like these deserve a swift and definitive response, but often insurance companies do their best to limit payouts and downplay the damages the accident has caused. A Knoxville attorney can work with the victim’s family to make sure justice is served and victims receive compensation for the pain and suffering they’ve had to endure.

Source: wate.com, “5 time DUI offender accused in deadly Knoxville crash may get plea deal with parole eligibility after six years,” Stephanie Beecken, April 22, 2014

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