PROFESSIONAL  AGGRESSIVE  EFFECTIVE

PROFESSIONAL AGGRESSIVE EFFECTIVE

  1. Home
  2.  » 
  3. Injuries
  4.  » The truth behind PTSD myths

The truth behind PTSD myths

| Apr 23, 2020 | Injuries

Not all debilitating injuries from an accident are physical in nature. Post-traumatic stress disorder is a psychological condition that can affect people who have experienced or witnessed a disturbing event, such as a serious accident.

People understand injuries that leave physical wounds, marks or scars behind. Because these are not present with psychological conditions like PTSD, people do not understand them as well. What follows is the truth behind many common misconceptions that people continue to entertain about the condition.

  1. PTSD affects people other than soldiers

There is a strong association between PTSD and war. In the past, the condition bore names that reflected this, such as combat fatigue or shell shock. It is true that serving in combat is a significant risk factor for post-traumatic stress, but it is not the only possible cause. Any traumatic event, such as a car accident or a physical assault, has the potential to produce symptoms of PTSD.

  1. Symptoms of PTSD do not necessarily show up right away

PTSD symptoms usually start showing up sometime within the first six months following the trauma. However, delayed onset after the initial six months have elapsed is also possible.

  1. Not every trauma results in PTSD

The incidence of trauma is much greater than that of PTSD, which suggests that most traumatic experiences do not result in symptoms of post-traumatic stress. It is not entirely clear why some people experience PTSD while others do not, but it does not indicate that the person is weak. Post-traumatic stress disorder is an illness, and it is no more possible to overcome it through force of will than it is to talk oneself out of diabetes or the common cold.

  1. PTSD is treatable

Unfortunately, due to the stigma associated with post-traumatic stress disorder, some people never seek treatment. While it is true that there is not a cure for PTSD, medications and other therapies can help people manage the symptoms so that they no longer disrupt other life activities.

PTSD due to an accident is a personal injury like any other. Therefore, it may be possible to hold those responsible to account.

Archives